500 Years of Night

Release Date: 2014-04-22
Available now on:

Includes 16 Page Booklet of lyrics and photos. B&W photos by Marco Antonio Cruz except Marcos Portrait by Angeles Torrejon, additional colour photos by Kerry Shaw.

  1. Tiro de Gracia
  2. Presa Fácil
  3. 500 Years Of Night
  4. Ni Uno Más
  5. Okavango
  6. Huapango del Tequila
  7. Máscara de Esperanza
  8. Cotorras en la Sima
  9. Fruta de Amor
  10. Canción Mixteca
  11. Nuevo Día, Hombre Libre
  12. El Jinete

Arranged By – Quique Escamilla (10, 12)
Art Direction, Design, Layout – A Man Called Wrycraft
Bass – Dan Mock (1, 2, 4, 5, 10), Quique Escamilla (6, 7, 9, 11)
Cello – Amy Laing (3)
Drums – Michael Brushey (1, 2, 5, 10, 11 )
Electric Guitar – James Robertson (9, 10)
Fiddle – James McKie (6)
Guitar, Vocals – Quique Escamilla (1 to 12)
Harmonica – Paul Reddick (10)
Keyboards – Mathew Stagmena (9)
Mandolin – Chris Bartos (9)
Mastered By – Joao Carvalho
Pedal Steel Guitar – Andrew Frost (3)
Percussion – Chendy Leon (3, 4), Quique Escamilla (1, 2, 4, 6, 7, 9, 11)
Producer – Quique Escamilla
Producer, Recorded By, Mixed By – John MacLean (3)
Rap, Vocals – Ab Dominal* (5)
Theremin, Sound Designer – Quique Escamilla (4)
Trombone – Paul Tarussov (1, 2, 4, to 7)
Vocals – Quique Escamilla (5)
Written-By – Quique Escamilla (1 to 9, 11)

Juno Awards

2015 JUNO Award Winner – World Music Album of the Year

℗ 2014 Lulaworld Records

Album Review

Quique Escamilla's new album, 500 Years of Night, tackles modern social issues with talent and candour. It must be stated from the beginning that Escamilla possesses the intangible ability to connect. The title track begins with the far-off pining of distant slide guitars, a remembrance of his Mexican home and the memory of past injustices. "500 Years of Night" is a magnetic call for action that, similar to Bob Marley, is structured like a protest song without losing any powerful musical merit. The sensory adventure provided by Escamilla is lovelorn and bitter, yearning for peace and resolution in a homeland presently in turmoil.
But Escamilla is a musician first and social commentator second: he effortless conveys delight on "Huapango del Tequila," as mariachi strumming and joyful trumpet flares give us a glimpse into the lighter side of Escamilla, while the placid tempo and delicate delivery of acoustic gem "Contorras en la Sima" paints an idealized pastoral landscape, natural and free from strife. Escamilla's ability to craft observant songs is second only to his ability to evoke empathy and beauty from the musical landscapes he creates.
- Lulaworld